For the past two months I have been asking myself, why do we use social media? The answer is to create conversation, and hopefully one that is transparent. Social media leader, Brian Solis and creative agency JESS3 have brilliantly created an improved version a Web 2.0 Conversation Prism. The Conversation Prism has several different layers to represent the “expansiveness of Social Web and the conversations that define it.”  Solis points out that transparency serves various forms of both genuine and hollow, which are separated by their purpose and impression. Relationships are measured in the value, action, and attitude that others take away from each conversation.  Transparency and authenticity of each conversation will ultimately bring information and solutions to others.

Maybe it was implied in Solis’ model, but what makes everything work together is trust. We trust that all users, companies, organizations, and bloggers, will “honor the trust they have been given.”  Web 2.0 needs a guide of ethics so what is published online can be seen as transparent, and making brands truly authentic.

We have become more trusting over time, relying on information based on relevance and how accessible they are to find instead of trustworthiness. The day we do not have to keep our guard up when entering a conversation is the day true transparency has arrived. We have learned through others that social media can be the breeding ground of truth or the contagious spreading area of lies and dishonesty. No, I haven’t become a pessimist of Web 2.0. I just think that before anyone enters a conversation we all should look at it with cautious eyes and hope what we see is the truth. Authenticity will follow right behind.